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Blake Rubin | Exclusive Interview with top-notch mobile developer from Los Angeles.

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Blake Rubin is a mobile developer from Los Angeles. Having spent most of his life in California, he has witnessed countless revolutionary upgrades in the field of technology. After a while, he became impressed with the nature of the industry and started learning more about it. It did not take long for Rubin’s skills with numbers to launch him as one of the top students in his class. Nowadays, everything he learned from college and hands-on training has cemented his spot on the list of top mobile developers on the West Coast.

Although a lot of his work varies on a case-to-case basis, some of the most common services people need Blake Rubin for are complete framework construction, diagnostics, and consultation. In his mid-30s, he has had a little over a decade to establish a reputable client base that consists of medium to medium-large firms. Thus, nearly every project on Rubin’s schedule is granted to originate from a long-term buyer. This is also the main purpose of his relocation from LA to San Francisco.

Skills-wise, Blake Rubin is not the one to praise his abilities through previous battles. On the contrary, he will explicitly disengage from most conversations that are not aimed at the future. This enables him to maintain a lases-focused demeanor with no alternative goal than upcoming triumphs. Looking over the long-lasting resume of all of his up-to-date accomplishments, however, it is safe to pin a couple of attributes to Rubin nonetheless. Those include a sheer determination and thoroughness.

Where did the idea and inspiration for mobile development come from?

In reality, it came out of nowhere. Nevertheless, I generally value those type of epiphanies the most. I was reading a highly complex article one day and it just clicked. I understood all of it without ever learning about this. So, I decided to throw some caution to the wind and came up with the idea to study mobile development.

What does your typical day look like and how do you make it productive?

I tend to wake up relatively early. My goal is to make it to the office by 9 so that I can complete morning reviews of projects by noon. Then, I talk with my clients and deal with any last-minute issues. Lunch is generally around 2 o’clock and this helps me maintain my productivity levels as I get a spike in energy.

How do you bring ideas to life?

By drawing them out. I have always been a visual learner and my best products tend to come from in-depth notes and sketches.

What’s one trend that excites you?

I like the artificial intelligence that phones are now built with. It is almost like a real-life assistant that comprehends no less than a human being.

What is one habit of yours that makes you more productive as an entrepreneur?

Keeping a journal. I list all of my goals, projects, and ideas in a small notebook that I refer to every single day. It helps me remember what I still need to achieve and how to get there.

What advice would you give your younger self?

Learn to micromanage. I used to overlook things like the time of the next meal, per se, cause they appeared unimportant. I learned the hard way that this is not the case.

Tell us something that’s true that almost nobody agrees with you on?

Humans cannot compete with machines. I generally get a lot of backlash from my associates when I push the theory that people getting replaced with computers is good. Regardless, I am a firm believer in productivity that software brings to the table.

As an entrepreneur, what is the one thing you do over and over and recommend everyone else do?

I workout every two days. It helps me set a pace for my week with enough time in between to provide rest. I mean, staying healthy should be more important than meeting deadlines anyway.

What is one strategy that has helped you grow your business? Please explain how.

Hiring personality, not credentials. If I enjoy being around someone who is eager to learn, they will usually make a perfect employee. These individuals usually appreciate the opportunity so much that they will do everything in their power to help.

What is one failure you had as an entrepreneur, and how did you overcome it?

I lost a few clients in the past due to communication issues. Now, I live by the doctrine that if it was not written, it did not happen.

What is one business idea that you’re willing to give away to our readers? (this should be an actual idea for a business, not business advice)

Start your own company! Being a boss beats being an employee any day of the week. Start small and grow a sole proprietorship with those loyal to you.

What is the best $100 you recently spent? What and why? (personal or professional)

I just spent almost a $100 on a dinner with some of my coworkers. It was not a work-related meeting but an attempt for us to get to know one another better. By the end of the night, we were chatting like lifelong buddies!

What is one piece of software or a web service that helps you be productive? How do you use it?

Google Drive is my go-to web service. I have a lot of memos and spreadsheets that fly between my clients and I. Using a cloud software is the easiest way to implement real-time changes.

What is the one book that you recommend our community should read and why?

Although it may sound uncanny, “Sherlock Holmes” books are my favorite pieces ever written. They help put me in a mindset where I want to simplify difficult concepts.

What is your favorite quote?

“Just because something doesn’t do what you planned it to do doesn’t mean it’s useless” by Thomas Edison.

Key Learnings:

Best ideas usually come at the most unexpected times.

Writing things down is the best way to stay on track with deadlines and properly communicate with clients or associates.

Human are unable to compete with machines due to their robust nature.

Hiring for success does not necessarily mean getting individuals with the most credentials.

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